PDP11

The PDP-11 is a series of 16-bit minicomputers sold by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) from 1970 into the 1990s, one of a succession of products in the PDP series. The PDP-11 was easier to program than its predecessors through the additional general-purpose registers. The PDP-11 replaced the PDP-8 in many real-time applications, although both product lines lived in parallel for more than 10 years. In total, around 600,000 PDP-11s of all models were sold, making it one of DEC's most successful product lines. It was succeeded in the mid-range minicomputer niche by the 32-bit VAX-11.

Digital Equipment Corporation, also known as DEC and using the trademark Digital, was a major American company in the computer industry from the 1960s to the 1990s. It was a leading vendor of computer systems, including computers, software, and peripherals, and its PDP and successor VAX products were the most successful of all minicomputers in terms of sales.

In the early 80s I started my career in IT as a trainee programmer working in a software bureau where the proportion of men and women were more or less equal. In fact, my second boss was female. In these early days we did everything. We wrote code,   we managed what was then a complicated process of printing and distributing reports, and we could re generate the whole computer from a cold start.

 

Women working in IT and with DEC  (Digital) PDP 11/70 in the 1980s